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Week of April 15, 2002

227th Anniversary of the beginning of the American Revolution!!!
On April 19, 1775, the American Revolution began in Lexington & Concord, Massachusetts.


"The shot heard round the world." -- From the 1837 poem, The Concord Hymn, by Ralph Waldo Emerson. It refers to the first shot of the American Revolution fired on April 19, 1775. It is unknown who fired this shot. Battles broke out in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, between Colonial Minutemen and British Redcoats. These were the first battles of the American Revolution. In 1783, eight years later, the American colonies gained independence and the United States of America was born.

>>Read The Concord Hymn
>>Visit Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Celebrate Patriot's Day 2002 in Concord
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

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Archives - Quote of the Week

 



Ben visits the Bunker Hill Monument in Boston, Massachusetts. It is one of the stops on the Freedom Trail.

>>Visit Ben's Photos & Links
>>Walk the Freedom Trail
>>Bunker Hill Stop on the Freedom Trail
>>Read about Ben Franklin
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Archives - Picture of the Week

 


Liberty! - The American Revolution - VHS
This 3-tape box set brings the American Revolution into your living room. What events led up to the American Revolution? What roles did George Washington and Ben Franklin assume during the fight for freedom? What happened at Yorktown? Learn the answers to these questions and much more. Great addition to your video library!

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>>Browse our Online Bookstore for books about your favorite Heroes

Archives - Feature Book

 


Question:
When were the Battles of Lexington and Concord fought? (month, date, and year)

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>>Check Your Answer

Archives - Trivia Question

 


Did you know Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote a poem about Paul Revere's ride?

Yes. It is called Paul Revere's Ride. It was written in 1860. Have you heard it before? The first stanza reads,

LISTEN, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

>>Read Paul Revere's Ride
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

Archives - Did You Know…

 


Paul Revere. His midnight ride on April 18, 1775, played a significant part in America's independence by warning the colonialists about the approaching British Army. Without his warning, who knows what would have happened at Lexington and Concord and who knows how the Revolutionary War would have turned out? -- Joe from Boston, Massachusetts.

>>Submit Your Hero
>>Visit The Paul Revere House
>>Old North Church Stop on the Freedom Trail
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

Archives - Who's Your Hero?

 


Question:
Who were the minutemen? (Eve, age 10)

Answer:
Minutemen were civilians who fought for the American colonies during the American Revolution against the British Army or Redcoats. The American Revolution began on April 19, 1775, in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. It officially ended on September 3, 1783, when the Treaty of Paris was signed. In the Treaty of Paris, England recognized the independence of the colonies, and the United States of America was born. Did you know minutemen got their name because they had to be ready to fight at a minute's notice?

>>Visit Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Take a Tour of Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

Question:
When were the Battles of Lexington and Concord fought? (month, date, and year)

Answer:
April 19, 1775.
At dawn on April 19, about 700 British Redcoats led by Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith and Major John Pitcairn arrived in Lexington. They were met by about 70 warned-and-waiting colonial militia led by Captain John Parker on the Lexington Green (the town common). A shot rang out. Although it is unknown who fired this shot, the British opened fired on the colonialists, and the colonialists returned the fire. The battle and the American Revolution had begun. The British continued toward Concord, further to the west. They were turned back at Concord's North Bridge and retreated to Boston.

>>Visit Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Take a Tour of Minute Man National Historical Park
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Browse the American Revolution Bookstore

       

 

 

 


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