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2003 | Apr-Dec, 2002 | Jan-Mar, 2002 | Sep-Dec, 2001 | Jun-Aug, 2001 | Feb-May, 2001

 

 
2003:
Q: What is the Hero Clubhouse™? (Max from Glendale)
A: The Hero Clubhouse™ is the Official Online Newsletter of the IMA Hero™ Collection. Your membership in the Hero Clubhouse™ is FREE and VOLUNTARY. As a member, you will receive Newsletters, Quick Notes, and "Find Outs" written exclusively of its members, by its members, and for its members. Join Today and receive a 25% OFF Coupon!
>>Join the Hero Clubhouse™ Today!
>>Meet the Hero Clubhouse™ Founding Members

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September, 2003:
Q: Why is Galileo going to crash into Jupiter in 2003?
A: On October 18, 1989, Galileo was launched from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. On December 7, 1995, Galileo entered the orbit of Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. It flew its prime mission for two years, ending in 1997. Galileo was capable of gathering more information, and NASA extended Galileo's mission three times.
Now, the onboard supply of propellant is almost gone. The propellant is needed to keep the antenna pointed towards Earth. Without the propellant and the antenna, NASA could not control the trajectory or the spacecraft.
Therefore, NASA will intentionally put Galileo on a course to plunge into Jupiter's atmosphere on September 21, 2003. One of the reasons for this is so Galileo will not impact Europa because NASA wants to study Europa in the future without any disruption from Galileo.
>>Read about Galileo Galilei
>>Read about the times in which Galileo lived
>>Browse our Galileo's Books
>>View Photos of Galileo

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August, 2003:
Q: Where can I find nonfiction books about Sojourner Truth for 3rd graders? (Sue)
A: The IMA Hero™ Sojourner Truth Bookstore is categorized into "ages 4-8" and "ages 9-12," therefore, you may find books relevant to 3rd graders in both categories. We recommend A Picture Book of Sojourner Truth for young readers who are first reading about Sojourner Truth. (We also recommend any "Picture Book" by David A. Adler as an introduction to biographies for young readers.) The Amazon.com review for Walking the Road to Freedom mentions it was a useful book for 3rd grade book reports and biography assignments.
>>Browse Sojourner Truth's Bookstore
>>Browse the African-American History Bookstore
>>Visit Sojourner Truth's Links
>>From Your Page: December, 2002

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July, 2003:
Q: On a statue of a war hero, does the position of the horse's legs tell the fate of the war hero during the battle?
A: It is our understanding the position of the horse's legs on a battlefield monument of a horse and rider usually depicts the fate of the rider during the battle.
If all four of the horse's legs are on the ground, the rider participated in the battle, and the rider was neither killed nor wounded during the battle.
If only three of the horse's legs are on the ground (and one of the legs is in the air), then the rider was wounded during the battle.
If only two of the horse's legs are on the ground (and two of the legs are in the air), then the rider was killed or mortally wounded during the battle.
In describing the above positions, we mentioned it "usually" depicts the fate of the rider during the battle. We used the word "usually" because this tends to be the protocol in designing monuments. However, we have not been advised that is it mandatory of the designer to create the monument in this manner.
This is a photograph of Robert E. Lee and Traveller on Seminary Ridge at Gettysburg. All four of Traveller's legs are on the ground which indicates Lee was neither killed nor wounded during the battle. Did you know Lee witnessed Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, from the location of this statue?
>>The Papa Tour stops at Gettysburg
>>Read about the Civil War
>>If You Lived at the Time of the Civil War

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June, 2003:
Q: What is a cloture vote?
A: According to C-SPAN, a cloture is the formal procedure used to end a filibuster. It can take up to three days and requires 60 votes. Cloture can also be used to ban non-germane amendments even if there is no filibuster underway. If cloture wins, 30 additional hours of debate are allowed prior to voting, but they are rarely used. If cloture fails, debate would continue without limits. Instead, the bill is usually set aside.
>>Find other definitions at C-SPAN
>>Find other definitions at Ben's Guide to US Government for Kid's
>>Learn more about the U.S. Government

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May, 2003:
Q: Where can I find ordering information about Harry Potter's Book 5?
A: The 5th Book in the Harry Potter Series is titled, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. It is scheduled to be released on June 21, 2003. You can find ordering information in our Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Bookstore. Amazon.com is currently taking pre-orders for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.
Books: You can Pre-Order either a
Hardcover, Deluxe Edition, or a Library Binding copy of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.
Audio: You can Pre-Order either an Audio Cassette or an Audio CD of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.
>>Browse the Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Bookstore
>>Browse the Main Page of the Harry Potter Bookstore
>>Browse the IMA Hero™ Bookstore

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April, 2003:
Q: What is the difference between the Compromise of 1820 and the Compromise of 1850? (Brandon P.)
A: The Compromise of 1820 admitted Missouri into the Union as a slave state. It also stated slavery would not be allowed in any state formed north of Missouri's southern border.
When the Compromise of 1820 was passed, the existing territories of the U.S. were either above or below this arbitrary line. This lasted until 1848. In 1848, the United States won the Mexican War and gained new territories in the west. One of these territories was California.
In 1850, California asked to join the Union. The Compromise of 1820 could not settle the issue of slavery in California because California extended across the arbitrary line marking the southern border of Missouri. The Compromise of 1850 tried to settle this dispute.
The Compromise of 1850 admitted California into the Union as a free state, and it stated the other territories recently annexed from Mexico (as a result of the Mexican War) would choose for themselves whether to be a free state or a slave state.
>>Read about the Compromise of 1820
>>Read about the Compromise of 1850
>>Read about the Civil War in our Reading Program

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March, 2003:
Q: Who was Cesar Chavez?
A: Cesar Estrada Chavez was one of the greatest labor leaders in the United States. He fought for a better life for migrant farm workers. In 1962, he founded the first successful farm workers' union. It was called the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA). He led strikes and boycotts, and he fasted to gain support for his causes.
Here is a Cesar Chavez Timeline:
March 31, 1927: Cesar was born on a small farm near Yuma, Arizona. He was a second generation American.
1938: Cesar's father lost his farm. The Chavez family moved to California, and became migrant farm workers. This meant they moved around and picked different foods depending on the season.
1942: Cesar graduated from the eighth grade and worked in the fields full-time. He realized the owners and contractors exploited migrant farm workers.
1944-1945: Cesar joined the United States Navy and fought in the Western Pacific during World War II. After the war, he returned to California, and continued working as a migrant farm worker.
1947: Cesar joined the National Agricultural Workers Union.
1948: Cesar married Helen Fabela.
1952: Cesar and his family moved to East San Jose, California, and settled in the barrio of Sal Si Puedes ("Get Out If You Can"). He began working for the Community Service Organization (CSO). He organized farm workers to vote and became the National Director. This was Cesar's first regular paying job.
1962: Cesar resigned his position with CSO to focus on helping migrant farm workers. He founded the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA). Cesar traveled to dozens of farm communities in California to build his base of dedicated farm workers. Cesar and the NFWA used non-violent means (strikes, boycotts, and fasting) to accomplish their goals.
September, 1965: the NFWA joined a strike started by the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC). They demanded higher wages for migrant workers from the grape growers. "Huelga" means strike in Spanish. The strike lasted five years, and the grape growers agreed to sign contracts. Farm workers were given higher pay, family health coverage, pension benefits, and other contract protections. This was the largest strike in the history of U.S. labor.
April 23, 1993: Cesar Chavez died in San Luis, Arizona. He was 66 years old.
August 8, 1994: Cesar posthumously received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. It is the highest civilian honor in the United States.
September 2, 1994: the Cesar Chavez Holiday bill was passed in California. March 31 is designated as Cesar Chavez Day. It is a state holiday to promote service to the communities of California in honor of Cesar's life and work.
>>Read about Cesar Chavez
>>Browse our Cesar Chavez's Books
>>View Photos of Cesar Chavez
>>Visit Cesar Chavez Links

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February, 2003:
Q: Did Rosa Parks found the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self-Development?
A: Yes. Rosa met Raymond Parks in 1931, and they were married in December, 1932. They lived in Montgomery, Alabama. In 1957, Rosa and Raymond moved to Detroit, Michigan. In 1977, Raymond Parks died. Ten years later, Rosa founded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self-Development to give young people hope and to help them complete their education.
>>Visit the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development
>>Read about Rosa Parks
>>Visit Rosa Parks' Links
>>Browse Rosa Parks' Books

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January, 2003:
Q: Where can I find information about the genealogy of Robert E. Lee? (Larry)
A: The IMA Hero™ Web Site has information about Robert E. Lee at the following links:
Robert E.'s Hero History
Robert E.'s Photos & Links
Robert E.'s Bookstore
Robert E. IMA Hero™ Bear
For information on Robert E. Lee's genealogy, you may want to visit the following Web Sites:
Birthplace of Robert E. Lee (Stratford Hall Plantation)
Lee Chapel & Museum at Washington and Lee University
Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial (NPS)

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