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2003 | Apr-Dec, 2002 | Jan-Mar, 2002 | Sep-Dec, 2001 | Jun-Aug, 2001 | Feb-May, 2001

 

 
March 25, 2002:
Q: Who was Wilma Rudolph?
A:
Wilma Rudolph was a U.S. athlete, teacher, and hero. She was born on June 23, 1940, in Clarksville, Tennessee. She had 21 brothers and sisters.
As a child, Wilma was sick with chicken pox, measles, mumps, scarlet fever, double pneumonia, and polio. Polio was very severe. Most children who contracted polio either died or would never walk again. Wilma was determined to walk and continued to exercise her paralyzed left leg. By age six, Wilma was fitted with a heavy steal brace to allow her to walk. One day, Wilma took off her brace and walked on her own. By age twelve, Wilma could walk without her brace, and she even mailed her brace back to the hospital where she received it.
In high school, Wilma became a basketball star and led her team to the Tennessee State Championships. Although her team lost, she captured the attention of Ed Temple, the Tennessee State University track and field coach. Wilma was given a full athletic scholarship to Tennessee State University.
In 1956, Wilma represented the United States at the Summer Olympic Games in Melbourne. She won a bronze medal for the 4 x 100 meter relay race. In 1960, Wilma again represented the United States at the Summer Olympic Games in Rome. She won gold medals in the 100 meter dash, 200 meter dash, and the 4 x 100 meter relay race. Did you know this was the first time a woman had ever won 3 Gold Medals in a single Olympic Game? On her return home, Clarksville threw a parade for Wilma, and it was the first integrated event in Clarksville.
After athletics, Wilma was a teacher, coach, and mother of four children. She served as a U.S. Goodwill Ambassador and started the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to inspire young athletes. Wilma Rudolph died on November 12, 1994, in her home in Nashville, Tennessee.
>>Browse the Wilma Rudolph's Books
>>More Wilma Rudolph's Links

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March 18, 2002:
Q: Did Wolfgang A. Mozart influence Ludwig van Beethoven's compositions?
A:
Here are four reasons which imply Mozart influenced Beethoven:
1. Mozart (1756-1791) lived before Beethoven (1770-1827). This proves it is at least possible for Mozart's work to have influenced Beethoven's work.
2. It has been written Beethoven had respect for the works of Mozart. This shows Beethoven had come into contact with Mozart's work.
3. Mozart and Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) influenced the Classical Period (1750-1820) by developing grand forms of symphony, opera, string quartet, and concerto. Beethoven composed his works during this time. Therefore, Beethoven could have been either directly or indirectly influenced by Mozart.
4. In 1787, Beethoven had planned to study under Mozart. Beethoven, however, had to change his plans when his mother became ill. In 1792, Beethoven began studying with Haydn in Vienna. Mozart had influenced the later works of Haydn, and therefore, it is possible this influence was passed from Haydn to Beethoven.
>>Read about Wolfgang A. Mozart
>>Read about the times in which Wolfgang A. Mozart lived
>>Browse Wolfgang A. Mozart's Bookstore
>>Browse Ludwig van Beethoven's Books

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March 11, 2002:
Q: How did you choose which Hero Clubhouse™ duties would be performed by which of the IMA Hero™ Bears? (Jenna P.)
A:
The Hero Clubhouse™ duties are based on the needs of the Hero Clubhouse™. These duties are then delegated to the twelve IMA Hero™ Bears based on the bears' expertise and skills. For example, Abraham Lincoln was a U.S. President so the job of President of the Hero Clubhouse™ is given to Abe, and William Shakespeare was a brilliant writer so the job of Media Relations which involves a lot of writing is given to the Bard of Avon.
>>Read about the Hero™ Clubhouse Founding Members
>>Join the Hero Clubhouse™ Today

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February 25, 2002:
Q: What do the Olympic rings represent? (Avery from New Hampshire)
A:
The Olympic rings are the official symbol of the Olympic Games. According to Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the founder of the Modern Olympic Movement, "[t]hese five rings represent the five parts of the world won over to Olympism." This refers to the meeting of athletes from the five original major continents (Africa, America, Asia, Australia, and Europe) during the Olympic Games.
The Olympic rings are five interlacing rings of blue, yellow, black, green, and red on a white background. These colors represent at least one of the colors used in the flag of every nation. There is no ancient basis for the symbol of the rings.
Did you know the first Olympic flag, displaying the Olympic rings, was made in 1914 to be used at the 1916 Olympic Games? However, the 1916 Olympic Games were canceled due to World War I, and the Olympic flag was first flown at the 1920 Antwerp Games. This flag is known as "the Antwerp flag" and was flown at every Olympic Games through 1984. A new Olympic flag was presented at the 1988 Seoul Games.
The Olympic flag must be prominently displayed in every Olympic city, and a large Olympic flag must be flown in the main stadium during the Olympic Games. At the Closing Ceremonies, the mayor of the host city presents the Olympic flag to the mayor of the next Olympic host city.
Did you know the Antwerp flag stated the Olympic motto, "Citius, Altius, Fortius," which means, "Swifter, Higher, Stronger?"
>>Symbols and Traditions of the Olympic Games (USA Today)
>>Visit the Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland
>>Browse the Olympic Games Bookstore
>>More Olympic Games Links

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February 18, 2002:
Q: Who was the first person to sign the U.S. Constitution? (Claudia M.)
A:
George Washington. In 1787, George Washington was chosen as the presiding officer of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Originally, the delegates gathered to revise the Articles of Confederation. However, they drafted a new document to govern the country. It is called the Constitution of the United States. As president of the convention, Washington was the first person to sign the document.
>>Read about the U.S. Constitution
>>View George Washington's Photos
>>Read about the times in which George Washington lived
>>Browse George Washington's Books

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February 11, 2002:
Q: Did Thomas Edison have a favorite invention? (John from Boston)
A:
Yes, Thomas Alva Edison's favorite invention was the phonograph. Edison once stated, "Of all my inventions, I like the phonograph the best." Did you know Edison holds more patents than any other person? Yes, he holds 1,093 patents.
>>Read about the Phonograph
>>Read about Thomas Alva Edison
>>Read about the times in which Thomas Alva Edison lived
>>Browse Alva's Bookstore

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February 4, 2002:
Q: What is the history of the Olympic Torch and Relay? (Paige W.)
A:
The Olympic Flame has roots in the Ancient Olympic Games -- a flame was lit by the sun's rays in Olympia, Greece, and continued to burn throughout the competition.
In the Modern Olympic Games, the Olympic Flame first appeared at the 1928 Amsterdam Games.
In the 1936 Berlin Games, the Olympic Flame was lit by the sun's rays in Olympia, Greece, just like it was during the ancient games. To get the Olympic Flame from Greece to Berlin, an Olympic Relay was started. The Olympic Flame was held by the Olympic Torch. This torch was carried by 3,000 runners through seven countries and arrived at the stadium in Berlin for the Opening Ceremonies. The final torchbearer lit the Olympic Cauldron, and the Olympic Flame burned throughout the Games. It was extinguished during the Closing Ceremonies. Did you know the first Olympic Winter Games Torch Relay took place in the 1952 Oslo Games?
Today, the Olympic Torch and Relay are important symbols of the Olympic Games. The Olympic Flame is lit in Olympia, Greece, and is carried on the Olympic Relay to the host city. The Olympic Flame lights the Olympic Cauldron during the Opening Ceremonies and burns for the duration of the Olympic Games. It is extinguished at the Closing Ceremonies with a promise it will burn again at the next Olympic Games.
>>See a Map of the 2002 Torch Route
>>Symbols and Traditions of the Olympic Games (USA Today)
>>Browse the Olympic Games Bookstore
>>More Olympic Games Links

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January 28, 2002:
Q:
How can I find out about Space Shuttle lift offs? (Kari D.)
A:
The Kennedy Space Center has its launch schedule on its web site where you can get lots of information about upcoming Space Shuttle launches. The next target launch date is February 28, 2002. Facts about the upcoming launch:
Orbiter Name: Columbia
Number of Crew Members: 7
Mission Number: Shuttle flight #108; Columbia flight #27
Mission Duration: 11 days
Landing Location and Date: Kennedy Space Center, March 11
Did
you know there are currently four Space Shuttles? They are Columbia, Discovery, Atlantis, and Endeavour. Endeavour replaced Challenger -- the second Space Shuttle -- which exploded 73 seconds after launch on January 28, 1986.
>>Find out more about Space Shuttle Launches
>>Visit Kennedy Space Center's Web Site
>>Interested in Space Camp?
>>View Photos of Apollo 11

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January 21, 2002:
Q: When did Martin Luther King, Jr. give his "I Have A Dream" speech?
A: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his famous "I Have A Dream" speech on August 28, 1963, from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. This speech was part of the March on Washington where more 200,000 people participated in the Civil Rights demonstration.
>>Read Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech
>>Read about Martin Luther King, Jr.
>>Browse Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Bookstore

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January 14, 2002:
Q: During the Revolutionary War, did Benjamin Franklin live in Britain and represent the colonies?
A:
No. Before the Revolutionary War, Benjamin Franklin lived in London, England, and represented the colonies of Pennsylvania, Georgia, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. However, during the American Revolution (1775-1783), Franklin lived in Paris, France, and rallied French support for America's cause.
>>Read about the American Revolution
>>Read about Ben Franklin
>>Read about the times in which Ben Franklin lived
>>Browse Ben's Bookstore

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